Is the Band T-shirt Dead?

Fashions come and go by definition, yet there are some articles of clothing that never go out of fashion completely. Usually an innovation comes along, or a peripheral trend drags them back into the public eye. For example, I’m thinking about denim jeans which have been a dominating and iconic item of clothing for decades, yet which seem to come in and out of vogue depending on other factors such as celebrity endorsement or innovation in styles of cuts. Another fashion classic is the music or band t-shirt. Are band t-shirts dead? Should they be consigned to the fashion room 101 along with stapress slacks and chunky cardigans with leather patches on the elbows? No, says this music t-shirt fan. Music and band t-shirts are still rocking on.

Where t-shirts began

T-shirts used to be undergarments. Nondescript items of clothing and nothing to shout about. That all changed when James Dean famously wore his classic white T-shirt in Rebel Without a Cause. Suddenly T-shirts because a youth item, a rebellious item of clothing that defied the formal shirt and tie wearing older generation. However, the shirts were plain. Mainly white in fact. In the late 1950’s however, things were about to change with the invention of a new material called plastisol ink which made it possible to print durable designs onto clothing. T-shirts continued to be the clothing of the rebellious throughout the sixties, when tie dying and other processes gave them a further surge in popularity. Bands also began to use t-shirts as a means of promotion, as did concerts where they were sold as souvenirs.

Music tees hit the mainstream

Thus, t-shirts moved into the mainstream as dress 인계동셔츠룸 styles shifted away from the formal suit and ties of the early sixties to the more casual look. Iron on transfers arrived in the 1970s which enabled t-shirt stores to open up in every town and shopping centre printing almost unlimited t-shirt designs. No trip to the seaside was complete without the acquisition of a cool new t-shirt, printed to order.

The punk explosion of the mid 1970’s then gave t-shirts a whole new lease of life with designers such as Vivienne Westwood adapting and creating outrageous new t-shirt designs using pop art images, safety pins and shocking prints. Once again, they became a potentially edgy and important fashion statement.